Digital Camera Selector

The Digital Camera Selector lets you tell it the characteristics of the camera you are looking for and then returns a short list of cameras and their details. To make your selections click on the arrows at the sides of each drop down box. Then click on a value to select it. You can select ranges for features such as megapixels and zoom. Help is available for each option. The help text will also explain why a particular feature could prove useful to you.

Make Selections and Then Click on Search for Cameras

Type of Camera Help
Brand Help
Megapixels From: To: Help
Length of Zoom From: To: Help
Guide Price From: To: Help
Minimum LCD Screen Size Help
Maximum Macro Distance Help
Type of Memory Card Help
Type of Battery Help
HD Movies Help
Movie Duration Help
Manual Controls Help
Viewfinder Help
Wide Angle Lens Help
Image Stabilisation Help
Touch Control LCD Help

Help and Notes

The following information explains the different selection criteria you can use with the camera selector.

Cameras Type

I have divided all the different types digital cameras into broad groups. If you are looking for a digital camera that is easy to use select the Simple and Easy group. The next step up you will find Standard cameras. These are cameras that can be used as simple point and shoot cameras, but tend to come with some additional features that you may find useful.

The Ultra Compact models are those designed to slip easily into a pocket or purse. These are normally easy to use cameras. Stylish cameras are models with metal bodies where there is an emphasis on design. With this group you will pay a premium for the build quality.

I have split the advanced cameras into two groups. The first group is Advanced Compacts. These cameras have a set of features that you would expect to find on a typical 35mm film SLR camera, but the camera retains a fairly compact shape. The second group Advanced Digitals have similar features, but are bigger and bulkier, built like an SLR camera.

A small group are waterproof. Some of these can be used in water to a depth of around 10m. A selection of these cameras are also shockproof, crushproof and freezeproof.

Finally there are the Digital SLR cameras. These are advanced cameras that accept interchangeable lenses.

For more information see the Digital Camera Buyer's Guide

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Brand

You can also choose to look only at cameras produced by a certain manufacturer. This will help you if you are a big fan of Canon or Sony etc.

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Pixels

One of the key features of any digital camera is the number of megapixels it is capable of recording. The more megapixels it can capture the larger the size of print the camera can produce.

The selector is set up so that you can choose to view cameras within a range of pixels or for a specific number.

For more information see How Many Pixels Do You Need?

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Zoom

Another key feature is length of zoom. The selector works with each camera's optical zoom capability. This is another area where you can select either a range or a specific amount of zoom.

For more information see How Much Zoom Do You Need?

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Price

Always a key feature when you are looking to buy. You can enter your price range.

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LCD Screen

A larger LCD screen can be a major help when you are lining up a shot. Screens vary in size typically from 2.5" to 3". There is a clear trend towards larger screens. The selector allows you to choose a minimum screen size.

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Macro Distance

A macro facility helps you to take close up shots. Typical macro photos are of insects, flowers and jewelry. The macro distance is the distance from the subject that the camera is capable of focusing. The shorter the distance the closer in the camera can get.

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MemoryCards

Memory cards are used by digital cameras to store photos and movies. Most cameras can only use one type of card, but others can use two or more. The most important point to remember is that if you are buying an additional memory card it has to be compatible with your camera.

For more information see All About Memory Cards

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Batteries

There are basically two types of batteries that a digital camera uses. The first are standard AA batteries. The advantage of these is convenience. You can buy them more or less anywhere. The downside is cost. Despite advances digital cameras are still heavy users of batteries and it can help to keep the running costs down if you buy some rechargeable batteries and a charger.

The other common type of battery is Lithium Ion. The advantage of these is that they are rechargeable. A battery and charger is supplied with the camera. The downside is that it is expensive to buy spares.

For more information see Make Your Batteries Last Longer

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High Definition Movies

There is now quite a choice of digital cameras offering High Definition movies. The majority use a resolution of 720p while a smaller number of cameras offer the higher resolution of 1080p.

For more information see Digital Camera Movies

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Movie Duration

Many cameras now allow you to record individual movies up to the capacity of the memory card. Others may only allow you to capture footage for a much shorter time. For example three minutes. The selector allows you to specify cameras that record up to the capacity of the memory card.

For more information see Digital Camera Movies

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Viewfinder

A viewfinder can be a big help on a sunny day when it may be difficult to see the LCD screen clearly. Switching off the LCD screen and using the viewfinder for lining up your shots can also help to conserve your batteries.

For more information see All the Major Features Explained

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Manual Controls

The more advanced cameras offer you manual exposure controls. This allows you to set the aperture and shutter speed settings. This is ideal for experienced photographers or anyone who would like to experiment with photography.

For more information see All the Major Features Explained

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Wide Angle

A wide angle lens allows you to squeeze more into a picture. This type of lens is particularly useful for shooting groups of people and landscapes. Be aware that a low percentage of digital cameras are built with wide angle lenses and your choice of camera is therefore restricted.

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Image Stabilisation

Image Stabilisation helps to compensate for any camera shake that occurs when a picture is being taken. Tiny gyroscopes within the lens help to eliminate or at least the blur that camera shake can create. This is also sometimes referred to as Vibration Reduction.

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Touch Control

Digital cameras with touch control screens offer a completely different way of controlling your camera. You need to take a little care when selecting one as some cameras only offer a few features controlled through touch, while others control more or less every feature through touch. There is no easy way of telling the level of touch control offered by individual cameras. As a rule of thumb Nikon, Samsung and Sony touch controlled cameras tend to have the widest use of touch. It is worth looking at the back of any camera to see how many buttons there are. A lot of buttons is likely to mean less touch control.

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See all digital cameras